Christ Catholic Church

The House Church Movement

"Let not your hearts be troubled; believe in God, believe also in me." (RSV) John 14.1


The Church began, not in some cathedral or building set aside for the purpose, but in an obscure upper room in Jerusalem.  In its earliest years, all the churches met in houses.

Paul speaks of the congregation which meets in the house of Priscilla and Aquilla; and in another epistle he greets the church which meets at Philemon's house.As the Church grew, many congregations became too large to meet in someone’s home, and special buildings were erected to house the worshiping crowd.  There were some obvious advantages to a public building; and soon the house churches disappeared.

Today, however, the house church is experiencing a revival; and for increasing numbers of people, it has a special and unique appeal.

In the early house churches, the congregations were small and the members were on intimate terms one with another.  Scores of experimental congregations of the so-called underground church have found the simplicity and the closeness of house worship refreshing and inspiring.

Among several American communions, it is not new but has developed because many of their congregations have been small.  Often times their smallness came about because of these groups’ single-minded concern with worship.  They had no need to erect special buildings, because they did not set out to win people through a round of social and educational activities that had little or nothing to do with the Gospel.  Hence, those seeking to get acquainted with the community of to find something to do with their spare time, do not seek a house church, but look elsewhere to large institutional churches of various denominations.   These house churches are content to seek out those who want to come to the Lord's Table to break bread together in the Presence of the Living Christ.

By limiting themselves to the preaching of the Gospel and remaining small, many communions have discovered some interesting advantages in house chapels.

Most important is that all who come are seeking to find God.  There are few social, business, or political advantages to attending worship with a small group meeting in a private home.  Consequently, there is a wonderful felling of fellowship and a common goal and purpose among the worshippers in a house chapel.







 

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